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Cutty Sark

Cutty Sark was built in 1869 in Scotland's Dumbarton and was used for tea trade for 52 years. It is the last remaining tea trade clipper in the world.

Cutty Sark initially shipped tea from China, and after the introduction of steamboats and the opening of the Suez channel, it started shipping other things, such as wool from Australia. The boat is named after the nightgown of a witch in one of Scotland's national poet's, Robert Burns', poems. Nowadays the ship is used as a museum at the centre of Greenwich right next to the Thames. The Cutty Sark museum ship is raised 3m above ground, which allows you to walk under it and see its copper frame. On museum trips, you can also get to see the deck of the ship, as well as inside it. In the Cutty Sark museum, you can also get a British afternoon tea experience under the ship.

The area surrounding Cutty Sark is pleasant, and Greenwich's essential destinations and some of Greenwich's maritime museums are located nearby.

Getting there

Cutty Sark is located in Greenwich, which has no underground stations. The easiest way to get to Cutty Sark is the Thames Clipper, DLR which has its station at Cutty Sark, or a train to Greenwich station which is 15 minutes walking distance away.

Nearby

The Greenwich area has numerous destinations which you should consider visiting. The Old Royal Naval College is right next to Cutty Sark, and both Greenwich Park and the Royal Observatory are both a short walking distance away.